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Tian Xu

Lunch Music will present music by Xu and Lin

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Tian Xu and Beibei Lin Will Present music for Violin and Piano

On February 2, from noon to 1:00 pm, the series will present a free concert in the auditorium featuring violinist Tian Xu with pianist Beibei Lin. The program will feature music by Maurice Ravel, Sergei Prokofiev, Bright Sheng, and Johannes Brahms.
Click here for more about the performers on the event page.
Support from Lorna Wood and Donald Wehrs and from anonymous friends of the series is helping to make this performance possible.
Prokofiev is known for the music he wrote for children, but Xu said he used simplicity in his other works as well. “Although he lived in the modern period, he always had the idea that he wanted to go back to composers like Mozart,” said Xu.
Tian Xu
Prokofiev’s solo violin sonata was originally written for a group of violinists to play together in unison. Xu said this leads to a lot of different ideas about how it should be performed. She said it is a piece with dark, heavy aspects along with sweet and lyrical moments.
Bright Sheng’s piece “The Stream Flows” is a love song sung from the streams below to a lover up in the mountains. Xu said it basically depicts the scenery of the countryside, reminiscent of an ancient, primitive lifestyle. The first movement is based on a folk song very familiar in China. “I heard it a lot when I was little,” said Xu, who grew up there.
Though she doesn’t get the chance to play music by composers from her home country very often, she loves to do it. She said the music often uses sounds from Chinese folk music and culture. “Whenever I hear the Chinese elements, it’s kind of nostalgic to me,” said Xu.
For the third week in a row, the program for A Little Lunch Music will include chamber music by Johannes Brahms. Listeners will hear Xu and Lin’s version of Brahms’s Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major performed in January by Guy Harrison and Jeremy Samolesky.
In writing the work, Brahms was inspired by a relationship that could never be, said Xu. She said when she first starts to learn a piece of music, she tries to be inspired by its story. “It’s a love song,” said Xu, “I would think of how he would feel.” Later, the more technical aspects enter in, such as phrasing and trading melodies with the piano.
But Xu said she holds on to the feelings throughout the process. “Love has its own sound, its voice,” she said. “You won’t forget about it.”
The duo will also perform Brahms’s “Scherzo” movement from the F-A-E Sonata. In 1853, Brahms, Robert Schumann, and Schumann’s pupil Albert Dietrich wrote the piece as a gift for violin virtuoso Joseph Joachim.
Xu said playing the music of Brahms makes her want to play it again and again. “In general, he always has a very warm sound, and he is very good at writing beautiful melodies,” she said.
Having won top prizes in national competitions in China, and high honors in others, Xu is a member of The Columbus Symphony Orchestra. She recently joined the violin faculty of The William Pu Academy in Atlanta, The LaGrange Symphony Orchestra’s Educational Initiative, and The Schwob School of Music Preparatory Division as an instructor of violin. She is a graduate of The Eastman School of Music.
On Thursday, Lin will open the program with two movements from Maurice Ravel’s solo piano suite titled “Miroirs.” Also born in China, Lin debuted as a soloist with the MasterWorks Festival Orchestra at age seventeen. She recently appeared as a guest artist soloist in Florida, Virginia, and Kansas and in 2016 served as collaborative pianist for the International Double Reed Society Conference. A doctoral candidate at Florida State University, she has been appointed Lecturer of Keyboard at the Schwob School of Music at Columbus State University and Instructor of Piano for the school’s Preparatory Division.
Headshot of musician Yinzi Kong

Yinzi Kong and William Ransom Will Perform for A Little Lunch Music

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Emory Duo Will Feature Music for the Viola

On January 26, from noon to 1:00 pm, the series will present a free concert in the auditorium featuring violist Yinzi Kong with pianist William Ransom. The duo will perform Max Reger’s Suite No. 1 for Solo Viola and Johannes Brahms’s Sonata in F Minor, Op. 120, No. 1. Thanks to Nick & Pat Giordano and Anonymous Friends of the Series for helping to make this performance possible.
Click here for more about the performers on the event page. 
The concert is made possible in part by Nick & Pat Giordano and anonymous friends of the series.
Kong and Ransom have been playing together for 15 years. Ransom is head of the piano program at Emory University in Atlanta. Kong is on faculty there, too. She is also a founding member of the Vega String Quartet which recently became a permanent artist-in-residence group at Emory.
This Thursday’s concert at the museum is a preview of some of the talent that will be showcased in Auburn next month. The Vega Quartet, along with Ransom, will perform on February 15 at Goodwin Hall as part of a concert hosted by the Auburn Chamber Music Society.
On Thursday, Kong will play Reger’s “Suite No. 1 for Solo Viola.” A German composer, Reger was a student in the tradition of Bach, said Ransom. Ransom said that like Bach over 100 years before, Reger lived, worked at a church, and died in Leipzig, Germany.
Ransom said composer Max Reger’s work is fairly obscure. But he said Reger’s viola pieces are often programmed by violists because not much, relatively speaking, has been written for solo viola.
“For me, this piece is a monologue of growing pain,” said Kong. She said the music makes her think of a person’s journey to maturity, starting at a point of frustration at being different and misunderstood. From there, she said the music moves to making peace, then finally embraces and celebrates what she called “the being.” “The expressiveness of the viola as an instrument is fully explored,” she added.
“Reger used counterpoint and wrote a lot of fugue and variation,” said Ransom, further making the connection from Bach to Reger. The solo piece’s suite form is reminiscent of Bach’s six famous cello suites. But as part of the end of Western music’s Romantic Period, Reger used a more modern tonality, said Ransom. “It’s very easy to listen to.”
Kong studied at the Shanghai Conservatory and the Manhattan School of Music. She enjoys an award-winning career in both solo and chamber music performance and teaching. She performs in the world’s concert halls including Carnegie Hall, and her live performances have been internationally broadcast. She collaborates with musicians including Elliot Fisk, Richard Stoltzman, Charles Wadsworth and Sarah Chang.
“I am often provoked by the music to feel a certain way,” said Kong. She said music is a like a mirror that reflects who we are or at least a part of some experience of our lives. “I don’t want my audience to be limited by my story,” she said, adding, “but dare to look into this mirror themselves.
Ransom collaborates with musicians including Yo-Yo Ma, Richard Stoltzman, and members of the Tokyo, Cleveland, and Juilliard String Quartets. In addition to his faculty position, he is founder and Artistic Director of the Emory Chamber Music Society of Atlanta. A graduate of Juilliard and of the University of Michigan, he is Artistic Director of both the Highlands-Cashiers Chamber Music Festival in North Carolina and the Juneau Jazz & Classics Festival in Alaska.
Audience members at last week’s A Little Lunch Music would have heard clarinetist David Odom perform with pianist Jeremy Samolesky. The two performed Johannes Brahms’s clarinet sonata Op. 120, no. 2. This week, Kong and Ransom will perform no. 1, transcribed for viola.
Ransom said the two Brahms sonatas are very different. Where no. 2 is more reflective, no. 1 is very dramatic and passionate. “It rekindled his youth,” said Ransom, noting that the piece was written near the end of the composer’s life.
Brahms was known for writing very long, substantial works for piano, for orchestra, and for chamber groups. Near the end of his life, he was mainly writing short pieces for piano and organ. “He had pretty much given up what he called professional composing,” said Ransom.
Hearing a performance by clarinetist Richard Mühlfeld inspired Brahms to write serious pieces again, said Ransom. He wrote these two sonatas, a trio, and a quintet, all which featured the clarinet. These were the last four of Brahms’s works that had the substance and length of his earlier signature pieces.
Compared to the Reger sonata, Kong said the Brahms piece is much more subtle and abstract. “For me it is more a mood, some thoughts here and there,” she said.
Ransom said the last movement of the sonata is brilliant and validictory. “It’s a very positive movement that ends in a bright, sunny mood,” he said.

AU Faculty Will Perform for A Little Lunch Music

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Museum Series Will Feature Brahms Chamber Music

On January 19, from noon to 1:00 pm, the series will present a free concert in the auditorium featuring pianist Jeremy Samolesky, baritone Matthew Hoch, soprano Anne Duraski, violinist Guy Harrison, and clarinetist David Odom. The program will feature chamber music by Johannes Brahms. Thanks to anonymous friends of the series for helping to make this performance possible.
Thursday’s program will include three pieces by Johannes Brahms, one of the defining composers of western music’s Romantic Period. Brahms lived from 1833 to 1897. Samolesky said he began playing Brahms’ music in undergraduate school. He said he was struck by the melodies, how expressive and singable they are.
“It’s incredibly satisfying to play, physically as well as emotionally,” said Samolesky. He said he has experienced everything from extreme fragile intimacy to full-blown passionate drama in Brahms’ music.
Samolesky has played all of Brahms’ solo piano music and much of his chamber music. Thursday’s program will highlight the composer’s chamber music. Featured will be a set of vocal duets, a violin sonata and a clarinet sonata.
“All of these pieces are extremely difficult,” said Samolesky, adding that everyone’s part is equally hard to perform. He said this is true not only in a technical sense, but also in communicating the musical essence. But he said with Brahms, the virtuosity always serves a musical purpose, and doesn’t exist only to show off a performer’s talent.

Pictured: Jeremy Samolesky

“All of his chamber music is musical conversations between all the instruments,” said Samolesky. He contrasted this with earlier works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, whose trios are melodically dominated by the piano and whose string quartets showcase the first violin. In Brahms’ music, Samolesky said each voice carries the same importance.
The conversational aspect of the music is most evident in Brahms’ “Vier Duette (Four Duets), Op. 28,” for soprano, baritone and piano. In this set of four pieces, each scene is a conversation between two characters. And Samolesky said even in this relatively short piece, the emotions range from bright and joyful to tragic despair.
Samolesky said Brahms wrote three very different violin sonatas and two very different clarinet sonatas. But he said the violin and clarinet sonatas they will perform Thursday happen to be very similar. He said that in a way, they represent Brahms’ later style of writing, which was more subdued and reflective. He said they are not without passion, however, including long, rich melodies that are singing and beautiful.
Samolesky said Brahms’ chamber music has left an indelible impression on him, and colleagues have expressed the same. “I do remember every single time I played Brahms chamber music,” he said. “I remember where I was and who I played it with.”

“A Little Lunch Music” Returns for Spring 2017

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Museum Series Opens with American Opera and Art Song, Jazz Returns After Hours

On January 12, from noon to 1:00 pm, A Little Lunch Music will present a free concert in the auditorium featuring soprano Stephanie Tingler with pianist Martha Thomas. The duo will present vocal music by 20th-century American composers including Florence Price, Richard Hageman, and Lori Laitman.
The concert is made possible by a grant from the SEC Academic Initiative.
In 2013, Tingler and Thomas put together a program of American vocal music to take to Kenya and then later Brazil. Tingler said the project was extremely well received, and not only by their audiences. She also discovered in herself a strong connection to American poetry, which is often the text American composers choose to set to music.
For centuries, the bulk of classical repertoire for singers, American or otherwise, has been from other countries. It is expected for performers to learn standard pieces in non-native languages. Only in recent decades has the United States established itself as a serious source for vocal repertoire. Tingler said it has now become a focus of her career.
“American music has become a big part of my life,” said Tingler. She said as an American, she is able to understand the subtle cultural references and idioms found in American opera and art song. “There are so many things at work in American music that make it more interesting,” she said. “As I’ve gotten older, I’ve found that the poetry that composers are setting has gotten more rich and full.”
Composer Libby Larsen’s piece, “Margaret Songs,” sets to music poems of Willa Cather, an American writer who lived at the turn of the 20th century. Though the text is from an earlier time, Tingler said she loves how Larsen uses her music to bring Cather’s ideas into the present.
“I’m a preacher’s kid,” said Tingler, adding that she always learned that the word was most important. “In the beginning was the Word,” she said, quoting the first verse from the Book of John in the New Testament. She said the verse was also one of the first things spoken to her by a vocal teacher in graduate school.
Tingler noted that the importance of text has been a theme of her life. She said what connects her most strongly to a piece of music is how the lyrics apply to life now.
“Beyond all price” by composer Lori Laitman is another example of that. The song is from Latiman’s opera, “The Scarlet Letter,” based on the 19th-century novel by Nathaniel Hawthorne. David Mason wrote the text. “He understands the woman’s point of view,” said Tingler, explaining he was able to bring ideas of women’s struggle for equality effectively into the 21st century.
Tingler has appeared in leading roles with opera companies throughout the US and in Brazil. She has been honored by her selection into top art song festivals and series, and has collaborated in chamber music with notable instrumental and vocal performers. She has won honors and awards at national and international performance competitions and has received grants and recognition as a teacher, scholar and author. She holds undergraduate degrees from East Carolina University and from Northern Kentucky University and graduate degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music and Ohio State University. She was appointed to the School of Music faculty at the University of Georgia in 1992, where she is currently Associate Professor of Voice.
Thomas maintains an active career as recitalist and collaborative artist, giving concerts and appearing at festivals and conferences across the United States and in Canada, Australia, Europe, and Africa. She is now featured on eight compact disc recordings on the ACA Digital, Centaur, and Albany labels. Her CD of the solo piano music of George Rochberg garnered excellent reviews and a citation in the New York Times. A native Texan, she holds degrees through the doctoral level from the Universities of Texas and Wisconsin. She is currently the Despy Karlas Professor of Piano and Associate Director for Academic Programs at the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at the University of Georgia.
The duo has recorded a CD and has created a second program of American music, which is what they will perform in Auburn this week. In addition to Thursday’s noon concert at the museum, on Friday they will present a masterclass at Goodwin Recital Hall at 11:00 a.m. and a lecture recital at 3:00 p.m. All events are open to the public.
JCSM After Hours
On Thursday night from 5-8 p.m., the museum will be open for its weekly JCSM After Hours. The exhibitions are free to the public and the cafe and gift shop are open. Music is featured in the relaxed, club-like atmosphere. This week the house band Cullars Improvisational Rotation will return. It is a jazz trio made up of Dan Mackowski on guitar, Patrick McCurry on saxophone, and Jason DeBlanc on bass.

Museum to Host Violin and Piano Music for Final 2016 Noon Concert

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Museum to Host Violin and Piano Music for Final 2016 Noon Concert

On December 15, from noon to 1:00 pm, A Little Lunch Music will present a free concert in the auditorium featuring violinist Elzbieta Tokarska with pianist Ksenia Kurenysheva. The duo will present music by Francis Poulenc, César Franck, and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

A gift from Jim & Sue Haygood is helping to make the concert possible.

Thursday’s concert will mark Kurenysheva’s fifth performance at the museum. Her first was in 2012, her first year in the United States. Appearing in the series, She has performed as a soloist and with Auburn violinist Lorna Wood.

The Russian Kurenysheva and the Polish Tokarska are both winners of top prizes in international festivals. They met at Columbus State University’s Schwob school of music. They started out with a lot of classes together and soon began working on chamber music. Now, Kurenysheva is working on a doctorate at the University of Georgia in Athens, and Tokarska is doing graduate work at CSU. Making music together is still very important to them.

The duo will perform a violin sonata by Poulenc, a French composer. Kurenysheva compares his music to that of the Russian Sergei Prokofiev. She said as 20th-century music, it is adventurous in its harmonic structure, but never moves into serial music, using certain patterns and techniques that ignore traditional harmony and melody.

As an example of French music, she said Poulenc’s music is not as romantic or melodic as Claude Debussy’s or Maurice Ravel’s, but it is still entertaining. As an example of neoclassical music, it is well-organized, like Prokofiev. “You will understand themes and how they develop throughout the piece,” she added.

Though Kurenysheva said the Belgian composer Franck would perhaps not have appreciated the complement, she believes that his Sonata for Violin and Piano is a great example of typical French music. “Franck is very open and expressive,” she said.

Like many pieces, the violin part of the Franck sonata has been transcribed for other instruments. As a collaborative pianist, Kurenysheva has played it many times. “Everybody wants to play this piece,” she said, adding that no matter what the arrangement, the piece never suffers. She said this is not true of all music.

“The thematic material is interesting, it’s so sincere,” said Kurenysheva. “Everything is absolutely perfect.”

About Tokarska’s playing, Kurenysheva said she is a leader whose strength is in the music’s drive. “Her sound is very expressive,” she said, adding, “Her lower range is really dense and singing like a human voice. I love to play with her.”

The program will close with Tchaikovsky’s “Waltz of the Flower” from his “The Nutcracker Suite.”

JCSM After Hours

On Thursday night from 5-8 p.m., the museum will be open for its weekly JCSM After Hours. The exhibitions are free to the public and the cafe and gift shop are open. This week will be Holiday Family Night with pianist Mary Slaton performing Christmas music. There will be an art activity for kids, snacks, and discounts in the shop.

Camera Lucida: Rick Silva

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Popular culture has been molded by television and electronic graphic information since the mid-20th century. Whether appearing on a TV console, computer monitor, or smart device, video has become a comfortable, accessible, and preferred medium for both consumption and creation, especially to those among us under 30. Many critics today consider it to be this generation’s quintessential format for expression. Camera Lucida features eight contemporary artists from around the world who work with video and digital moving imagery. Artists Jay Bolotin, Rob Carter, Joe Hamilton, Yeon Jin Kim, LigoranoReese, Jillian Mayer, Rosa Menkman, and Rick Silva offer fresh perspectives on enduring concerns and new issues, using a technology that is widely familiar through common exposure, if not as broadly known as an independent art form. Yet video has been used as an eloquent and powerful vehicle by artists for more than 50 years, ranging from early documentary formats and narrative expositions to digital abstraction and game-playing interaction. JCSM’s survey provides a compelling look at the state of the medium today, where age-old intentions find new purpose in new applications.

This exhibition has been made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Like Menkman, Rick Silva creates videos and other moving digital art using imaging software. Often, these are designed for a hosted existence on the web, where users may freely access them on personal devices. Some of his past works adopt the commonplace form of the animated GIF, those ubiquitous, looping graphic emblems that enliven websites and HTML emails, often to the irritation of the end user. In Silva’s handling, the result is much more sublime. His projects frequently examine aspects of the landscape and wilderness in the present day. The Silva Field Guide to Birds of a Parallel Future, installed in Camera Lucida on a grid of six wall-mounted monitors, displays looped animations of abstracted avian forms sequenced in eerily naturalistic dynamics of flight. Reminiscent of Leonardo da Vinci’s sketchbook studies of nature in motion, they also hint at a dystopian future in which those living forms have been supplanted by avatars.

This video contains an excerpt of the artist’s work.

Camera Lucida: Jay Bolotin

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Popular culture has been molded by television and electronic graphic information since the mid-20th century. Whether appearing on a TV console, computer monitor, or smart device, video has become a comfortable, accessible, and preferred medium for both consumption and creation, especially to those among us under 30. Many critics today consider it to be this generation’s quintessential format for expression. Camera Lucida features eight contemporary artists from around the world who work with video and digital moving imagery. Artists Jay Bolotin, Rob Carter, Joe Hamilton, Yeon Jin Kim, LigoranoReese, Jillian Mayer, Rosa Menkman, and Rick Silva offer fresh perspectives on enduring concerns and new issues, using a technology that is widely familiar through common exposure, if not as broadly known as an independent art form. Yet video has been used as an eloquent and powerful vehicle by artists for more than 50 years, ranging from early documentary formats and narrative expositions to digital abstraction and game-playing interaction. JCSM’s survey provides a compelling look at the state of the medium today, where age-old intentions find new purpose in new applications.

This exhibition has been made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Jay Bolotin turns to age-old forms of imaging technology in the creation of his richly layered, digital productions. Bolotin is a sculptor, printmaker, stage performer, and musician, in addition to being a maker of animated “motion pictures.” In all cases he remains at heart a storyteller. Bolotin Woodcut prints formed the basis for his epic “The Jackleg Testament, Part One: Jack and Eve,” screened in large format in Camera Lucida. This hour-long operatic tale was realized by scanning his prints for character and background elements, and animating them via computer. Bolotin’s original musical score and libretto combine with his expressionistic visual treatment in a reinterpretation of the Book of Genesis that channels the likes of Shakespeare, Blake, and Brecht. Bolotin’s most recent project, Kharmen, digitally brings to life his elaborate graphite drawings. Inspired in part by Georges Bizet’s 1875 opera Carmen, Bolotin credits as well the stories of Russian surrealist writer Daniil Kharms as source material for the 22-minute video.

Camera Lucida: Rosa Menkman

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Popular culture has been molded by television and electronic graphic information since the mid-20th century. Whether appearing on a TV console, computer monitor, or smart device, video has become a comfortable, accessible, and preferred medium for both consumption and creation, especially to those among us under 30. Many critics today consider it to be this generation’s quintessential format for expression. Camera Lucida features eight contemporary artists from around the world who work with video and digital moving imagery. Artists Jay Bolotin, Rob Carter, Joe Hamilton, Yeon Jin Kim, LigoranoReese, Jillian Mayer, Rosa Menkman, and Rick Silva offer fresh perspectives on enduring concerns and new issues, using a technology that is widely familiar through common exposure, if not as broadly known as an independent art form. Yet video has been used as an eloquent and powerful vehicle by artists for more than 50 years, ranging from early documentary formats and narrative expositions to digital abstraction and game-playing interaction. JCSM’s survey provides a compelling look at the state of the medium today, where age-old intentions find new purpose in new applications.

This exhibition has been made possible by grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Rosa Menkman makes art of a truly interactive nature by engaging her “audience” to become physical participants in completing the work. Xilitla is designed in a video game format. The viewer is transformed into a collaborator by way of a game controller to explore the malleable realms and conditions latent in the experience. However, this is not your normal role-playing game by any stretch of the imagination. Dead ends, unexpected or random consequences, and visual and auditory feedback artifacts, which were they to occur in a conventional game context would be considered negative glitches, are instead coded in and emphasized. Menkman’s work is centered in an aesthetic known as glitch art. Digital and analog errors—bugs in the system—are accepted and incorporated as intentional malfunctions. In Menkman’s work, the glitch disrupts one’s expectations and carries the user/viewer into a new moment or new momentum of understanding.

A Little Lunch Music Welcomes Andrew Wilder; AU Cultural Music Society Performs in Evening

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On December 1, from noon to 1:00 pm, the series will present a free concert featuring classical guitarist Andrew Wilder. Andrew will present music by Johann Sebastian Bach, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Juan Antonio Sanchez.

The concert will be in the Auditorium. Thanks to anonymous friends of the series for helping to make this performance possible.

Much of classical guitar’s repertoire is transcriptions. One of the two Mozart pieces Wilder will play was originally written for clavichord, a stringed keyboard instrument. Another was written for the glass harmonium which uses a series of spinning bowls and finger friction to make pitches.

Bach transcribed some of his own cello suites for a guitar-like instrument, but not Suite No. 3 which is on Thursday’s program. Even without an original version for guitar, Wilder said it works very well on the instrument.

Wilder said he is inspired by Bach’s devotion, not only to his faith, but also to  his attention to detail and his groundbreaking counterpoint style. Counterpoint is basically multiple independent melodies happening at the same time. “It’s amazing writing,” said Wilder, “I listen to Bach almost every day.” Wilder said Bach had a great ability to see his strength in writing this style, and didn’t stop writing it even after other Baroque composers had moved away from it.

A senior now at Columbus State University’s Schwob School of Music, Wilder said that as a freshman he met Chilean guitarist Jose Antonio Escobar when Escobar visited the school as a clinician. Through that contact, he became aware of the music of still-living Chilean composer Juan Antonio Sanchez. Sanchez wrote “Sonata Para Guitar” for Escobar.

Escobar is a virtuoso, and Wilder said Sanchez’s “Sonata” is extremely difficult. Wilder has wanted to perform it since he heard the piece. “I was obsessed with it,” he said. He would listen to it over and over again. Three years later, he has taken it on for himself, and has received good feedback from the composer who heard a recording online.

Wilder said “Sonata para Guitarra” is new, difficult, and obscure. Besides Escobar, Wilder said he is the only person playing it right now. But he hopes listeners won’t hear the difficulty. He said it is full of singable melodies, percussive Chilean rhythms and jazz influences.

Wilder was born into a musical family with 10 brothers and sisters who have all studied classical music extensively, and with parents who are both professional classical musicians. He has performed and studied throughout Europe, the United States, and South America.

As a soloist, Wilder has been the recipient of awards including first prizes in the Senior Guitar competition of the Society of American Musicians, the International Tennessee Guitar Competition, and the Art of Strings international competition.

He was a prizewinner in the East Carolina University Guitar competition and the Troy University Guitar competition and was a recipient of the Koch Cultural Trust grant.

JCSM After Hours

Separate from the noon series is another music offering at the museum. Each  Thursday night, the museum’s cafe, exhibitions, and gift shop are open from 5-8 pm for JCSM After Hours. Live music is featured each week, often with the house band being the jazz trio, Cullars improvisational Rotation.

This week instead of jazz, the Auburn University Cultural Music Society will perform a mix of music. In addition to traditional Indian music and Indian-Western fusion, the group will bring in American gospel, blues, and old-time folk. Its members will present some original songs and spoken word pieces.

The Society is an Auburn University student organization that was founded in spring 2014 with the mission of bringing awareness to the Auburn community about the importance of cultural diversity through music. It was formed with the understanding that each culture has a different perspective on the uses of music and the sounds produced by its instruments. Members are guided by the idea that music has a way of unifying people with different nationalities and ideologies.

Holidays at Auburn’s Art Museum

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Holiday Hours

Spend your holidays here at Auburn’s art museum for our extended holiday hours, where our galleries and gift shop will be open for you and your family to enjoy.

Closed November 23-24
November 25-26: 10-4:30 pm
November 27: 1-4 pm

Closed December 24-25
December 21-23: 1-4 pm
December 27-30: 1-4 pm
Closed December 31-January 1

Regular operations begin on January 3

Detail of Amber Luster Chandelier

Holiday Gift Shop Sales

Give the gift of art! The museum gift shop is taking a 20% off regularly priced merchandise for the holiday season. Museum members can enjoy this discount on December 1, and regular shoppers on December 15 from 10 am to 8 pm.

Family Fun Night

Join us December 15, from 5-8 pm, for some holiday family fun! We’ll be creating cards, wrapping paper and gifts for the holiday season.

Welcome to the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art!

We are excited that you are here with us. Feel free to look around and reach out to us by navigating to our contact page.

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