Category

Leo Twiggs: Requiem for Mother Emanuel

Installation of Leo Twiggs at Auburn

Museum Live: Sept. 8, 2017

By | Art, engage | discuss | create, History, Leo Twiggs: Requiem for Mother Emanuel, News, Visiting Artist | No Comments

“Immanuel: A Symposium” was recorded and streamed live at JCSM on the afternoon before the opening of “Leo Twiggs: Requiem for Mother Emanuel.” The symposium provided the opportunity to discuss the African American church, and its historical and contemporary role as both sanctuary and location for civic and political activism.

“Under Their Own Vine and Fig Tree: African Americans and the Church in Southern History”

Presented by Dr. Richard Bailey, Alabama historian and retired research specialist

“We Are Charleston”

Presented by Dr. Bernard E. Powers, Jr. Professor of History, College of Charleston

Following this presentation, there will be a break.

“‘The Most Segregated Hour in America’: Churches and Social Justice Across the Color Line, from the Civil Rights Era to the Present”

Presented by Dr. David Carter, Associate Professor of History, Auburn University, and Dr. Johnny Green, Assistant Vice President for Outreach in Student Affairs, Auburn University

Following this presentation, there will be a panel discussion and a break. 

“Requiem for Mother Emanuel,” Dr. Leo Twiggs, Professor Emeritus, South Carolina State University

Please note that this lecture is sold out. A limited amount of seating will be available in the Museum Cafe for a live-stream of the program.

Dr. Twiggs’s lecture will shed light on his conceptualization and resolution of works in his exhibition of nine batik paintings he made in response to the June 17, 2015 massacre in Emanuel AME Church in Charleston and to its aftermath and far-reaching consequences.

Opening reception for Requiem for Mother Emanuel immediately follows.

Taking the exhibition as point of departure, the objective of the symposium will be to explore the history of the black church in the U.S., and to open a discussion about the historical intersections between the Christian conversion of enslaved Africans, and the metaphorical and real church as location and catalyst for spiritual and political redemption. “Immanuel,” the Hebrew word for “God is with us,” gave Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church its name, and the concept of “Immanuel” offers a powerful point of departure for both the artwork of Dr. Twiggs and the broader themes the symposium will explore. The symposium will consist of four talks and a panel discussion leading up to the opening artist talk. JCSM has been deliberate in choosing a scholar who can address the history of the African American church both nationally and in Alabama, a scholar from Charleston, and scholars from the local community.

The symposium has been made possible in part by a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Auburn University Special Lectures Fund.

NBC News: School Petition Compares Classroom Pride Flag to Confederate Flag

By | engage | discuss | create, Leo Twiggs: Requiem for Mother Emanuel | No Comments

Alabama high school petition compares pride flag to Confederate flag

An anonymous group of students and parents in Auburn, Ala., have signed a petition to have a rainbow pride flag removed from a high school classroom. The Change.org petition claims the flag is insensitive to students who do not support LGBTQ rights and compares it to the Confederate flag.

CBS News: Meet the Southern, African American artist who paints the Confederate flag

By | engage | discuss | create, Leo Twiggs: Requiem for Mother Emanuel | No Comments

Meet the Southern, African American artist who paints the Confederate flag

CHARLESTON, Va. — Leo Twiggs, a son of the South, sees life as a series of crossings. That’s why the 83-year-old artist has spent four decades painting a recurring symbol: The Confederate flag. He has finished hundreds of them. He says he paints the Confederate flag as a symbol because he thinks “the South is full of contradictions.

The New York Times: A Guide to the Charlottesville Aftermath

By | engage | discuss | create, Leo Twiggs: Requiem for Mother Emanuel | No Comments

A Guide to the Charlottesville Aftermath

Since a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday, news developments have continued at a torrid pace. If you are just catching up on the aftermath of the weekend’s events, or are overwhelmed by the volume of news, here is an overview of The New York Times’s coverage.

Welcome to the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art!

We are excited that you are here with us. Feel free to look around and reach out to us by navigating to our contact page.

Upcoming Events

Thu 28

A Little Lunch Music: Fall 2017

September 28 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Thu 28

Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers

September 28 @ 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Oct 05

A Little Lunch Music: Fall 2017

October 5 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm