Skip to main content
Category

University Faculty

The Jule Museum Podcast – Episode 28: Joe Minter

By Podcast, University Faculty, Watch + Listen No Comments

Tim Gihring of The Object Podcast from the Minneapolis Institute of Art explores the artist Joe Minter, featured in the exhibition “Black Codes: Art and Post-Civil Rights Alabama” organized by guest curator Dr. Aleesa Pitchamarn Alexander for the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University.

The Jule Museum Podcast – Episode 26: Elizabeth M. Webb and Joy Harjo

By Podcast, University Faculty, Watch + Listen No Comments

Elizabeth M. Webb and Joy Harjo in conversation at the Auburn Forum for Southern Art and Culture, a symposium organized by The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University on February 3, 2024.

Joy Har­jo, the 23rd Poet Lau­re­ate of the Unit­ed States, is a mem­ber of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

Elizabeth M. Webb’s exhibition “a bearing tree is a witness; an oak is an echo” is currently on view at The Jule as part of the series “Radical Naturalism” through July 7, 2024.

The Jule Museum Podcast – Episode 24: Walter Hood

By Podcast, University Faculty, Watch + Listen No Comments

Walter Hood talks about growing up in North Carolina and how he approaches painting in his creative practice. His exhibition “Arc of Life/Ark of Bones” opens on January 23, 2024, at The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University. The exhibition features a new series of paintings that recall memories from the first ten years of his life.

Walter Hood is the creative director and founder of Hood Design Studio in Oakland, California. He is also Chair and Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design at the University of California, Berkeley

The Jule Museum Podcast – Episode 21: Memory Mine

By Podcast, University Faculty, Watch + Listen No Comments

Sam Moyer talks about her exhibition “Memory Mine” at The Jule with Laura Sitterly ’23. Centering the exhibition on Alabama’s richness in natural resources and regional artists’ contributions, Moyer creates sculptures and paintings from one natural marble boulder mined in Sylacauga, Alabama.

The Jule Museum Podcast – Episode 20: Art Bargain of the Century

By Podcast, University Faculty, Watch + Listen No Comments

Charlotte Hendrix reads excerpts from “The Art Bargain of the Century” an unbelievable saga of how Auburn University purchased 36 controversial masterpieces and opened a world-class art museum for the 21st century, published in the Fall 2023 issue of Auburn Magazine.

Object Lab: Monument Maquettes

By Object Lab, Uncategorized, University Faculty No Comments

Students in courses, Sculpture as Space and Themes in Contemporary Sculpture at Auburn University, led by Associate Professor Kristen Tordella-Williams, researched and proposed contemporary monuments in response to the exhibition Monuments and Myths: The America of Sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Daniel Chester French. The students researched, proposed, and built maquettes of future monuments that fill in historical gaps and celebrate marginalized communities and spaces.

August 3, 2023

Chris Barraza, “Into Space”

Object Lab: Alabama Monuments

By Object Lab, University Faculty No Comments

For the Spring 2023 semester, Auburn University students across four disciplines worked with The Jule to explore themes related to the exhibition Monuments and Myths: The America of Sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Daniel Chester French. Throughout the semester, students visited the museum, discussed the exhibition alongside contemporary conversations around monuments, and engaged with curators from Chesterwood and Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park, the historic homes, and studios of French and Saint-Gaudens.

Below are essays from students in one of the courses under the direction of associate professor Elijah Gaddis, Department of History, College of Liberal Arts.

Alabama’s monuments offer ways to remember and pasts to forget. Their origin stories are complex tales of local negotiation, regional trends, and shared national values. But their messages aspire to simplicity. These essays, from the course, Museum Practicum, taught by Associate Professor Elijah Gaddis, are about Alabama monuments and the histories they reveal and conceal. As a compilation, they serve as a selective primer to accompany the Monuments and Myths: The America of Sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Daniel Chester French exhibition that will help you explore Alabama’s memorial landscape with new eyes and questions.

—Museum Studies Practicum Students
Dr. Elijah Gaddis

A stained glass window of a knight.Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

The Religion of the Lost Cause at the University of Alabama

By Jerryn Puckett The stained-glass window currently on display at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa showcases the religious and cultural iconography of the Post-Civil War South. Religion has been…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Traitorous Monuments in Public Spaces: Whose Heroes Are We Remembering?

The Monument to Confederate Soldiers and Sailors is a public display located on the State Capitol grounds in Montgomery, Alabama, erected in 1898. With almost 750,000 casualties, the Civil War…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Mobile’s King of Mardi Gras

By Patrick Ward How do you celebrate a man without knowing his cause? Joe Cain, credited with the revival of Mobile, Alabama’s Mardi Gras tradition, represents both a city’s celebration…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

The Power of White Progress to Conceal Black Pain: Dr. J. Marion Sim’s Historical Legacy

By Brucie Porter   The legacy of Alabama's "father of gynecology" masks the exploitation of Black bodies in medicine. On April 19, 1939, the Medical Association of Alabama unveiled a…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Youth, Education, and the Lost Cause: Gadsen’s Emma Sanson Monument

By Lori Sadler The myth of Emma Sansom’s role in the Civil War has led to a prideful indoctrination into the Lost Cause for students and residents of Gadsden, Alabama.…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Memorializing Booker T. Washington at Tuskegee University

By Zion McThomas The monument “Lifting the Veil of Ignorance” was sculpted in the early 20th century to commemorate the legacy and work of Booker T. Washington. Located in the…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Eufaula’s Lost Cause Monument

By Kevin Fabery The Confederate Monument in Eufaula, Alabama, was unveiled in 1904 through the efforts of Barbour County’s United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) chapter. The UDC, as their…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Birmingham’s Magic Rebels: Linn Park’s Confederate Monument

By Matthew Poirier Birmingham, Alabama was founded in 1871, and almost by magic, became an industrial boomtown by the 1890s. City leaders created a center of commercial prosperity as well…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Monument and the Memory of the Civil Rights Movement: the Civil Rights Memorial, Montgomery, AL

By Mickell Carter   The Civil Rights movement of the 1950s- 1960s is a central part of American memory. Events and key figures in the Civil Rights movement have inspired…
Alabama Monuments
July 27, 2023

Three Ministers: The Challenge of Memorializing the Civil Rights Movement

By Logan Barrett Three Ministers Kneeling illustrates both the progress and limitations in public memorialization of Alabama’s Black freedom struggle. Installed in Birmingham’s Kelly Ingram Park by sculptor Raymond Kaskey…

Episode 19: Indecent Spaces

By Podcast, University Faculty, Watch + Listen No Comments

Conversation about the project “Indecent Spaces” with Jonah Bokaer, Hala Shah, and Isaiah João at the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University.

“Indecent Spaces” is a project from the creative teams of Jonah Bokaer Choreography, Partner–In–Charge Charles Renfro of Diller, Scofidio + Renfro – DS+R, and Isang Yun, interpreted by violinists Angela & Jennifer Chun.

Born in part of the COVID–19 pandemic, Indecent Spaces is a multi–channel performance art and media piece exploring connections between a location’s meaning, citizenship and identity in the evolving 21st–century American landscape. Though today’s climate may seem to some removed from patriotic origins and idyllic intent, the collaborators’ examination reveals forgotten voices and bodily impact ever present through our nation’s history — aspirations of a more perfect union, albeit a complex one