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Galleries temporarily closed for exhibition changeout

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Following well-received presentations during the fall 2020 semester, museum staff members prep for the new academic year with an impressive exhibition schedule that juxtaposes media, techniques, viewpoints and historical time periods.

The galleries are closed to the public through Tuesday, February 2, 2021; however, the museum grounds remain open with the extension of “Out of the Box: A Juried Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition” through March 7, 2021. Face coverings are required on the grounds in accordance with “A Healthier U.”

The Museum Shop is now available online with convenient shipping.

Coming Soon

Outside In

February 2, 2021 through May 30, 2021

The Summer, 1658-59

Bernini and the Roman Baroque
Masterpieces from Palazzo Chighi in Ariccia

February 2, 2021 through May 30, 2021

Museum entrance

Operations schedule announced for the holidays and new year

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The Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University is closed Thursday, December 24, 2020 through Friday, December 25, 2020 and Thursday, December 31, 2020 through January 1, 2021.

Auburn University staff break for the holidays on Friday, December 18, 2020 and will return on Monday, January 4, 2021. The museum is closed to the public from January 5, 2021 through January 18, 2021 for exhibition changeouts.

The new exhibition schedule opens to the public on Tuesday, January 19, 2021.

A Black girl leans on her hand, with paper doll dimensions written on her dress.

Recent High-Profile Acquisition Set to Tour

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A high-profile acquisition funded by “Ten Seventy-Two — A Campaign for Collecting and Conserving Art” is already slated for a monumental survey in 2021.

In January, curators will exhibit “Dream Girl with Woven Camisole” by Emma Amos at the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens in an important new exhibition. From there, “Emma Amos: Color Odyssey” will travel to the Munson-Williams Proctor Art Institute in Utica, New York, and then to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Pennsylvania. Curators are producing a major research publication to accompany the tour, which includes approximately 60 works produced over the last 60 years.

A Black girl leans on her hand, with paper doll dimensions written on her dress.

“[Amos] used figurative painting, textiles and print media…to represent the complexity of her identity as an African-American woman and to push back on the ways that Black life has been treated in white Western art.”

Jillian Steinhauer“2 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now”, "The New York Times," Oct. 21, 2020

By making a year-end gift towards collecting and conserving art, you support a purposeful initiative to increase representation in the museum’s collections and increase these touring opportunities. Additionally, campaign funds raised to date will also help acquire works by Lavett Ballard, Delita Martin, Faith Ringgold and Carrie Mae Weems.

There are other significant museum purchases available in this focus; however, charitable giving is essential to secure these works for exhibition and study.

Will you further enhance this collection strength and create a space for critical conversations? Make a gift today.

Share your enthusiasm for museum education. Contact Ellen Killough, development officer, at 334.844.7032 or ellen.killough@auburn.edu.

A Black man plays guitar while a Black woman sews.

Collection Spotlight: Robert Gwathmey

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September is National Sewing Month, so our collection spotlight shines on “Singing and Mending” by Robert Gwathmey.

The artist, a white male, depicted rural life in the South in order to provide commentary on the power structures at play. Try “slow looking” as you consider the historical period, title, color and composition.

The guitar player’s head is angled down. What do you think his body language indicates? Both subjects have strong black lines on their forehead. Is this a happy scene? Consider how color choice could convey a mood.

Imagine the rhythm of her stitch in time with his guitar strokes and hear her song.

A Black man plays guitar while a Black woman sews.

"I'm a social being and I don't see how you can be an artist and be separate....Artists have eyes...You go home. You see things that are almost forgotten. It's always shocking."

Robert Gwathmay
Detail of French Poster

Centering Les Femmes: Loïe Fuller

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The unquestionable talent of the featured male artists fueled the passion for French Posters, but the female subjects are legends in their own right. Who were they, these female figures who posed, acted, sang and danced their way into the history of France and the canons of art history?

Printing four different color versions, Jules Chéret captured the whirling motion and multi-hued performance of the acclaimed artist, Loïe Fuller (1862–1928) in this celebrated poster. The American-born actress and dancer, who held numerous patents related to stage lighting and the use of chemicals in special effects, took Paris by storm with productions that combined dance, music and colored electric lights while dressed in diaphanous costume. Fuller’s innovative choreography inspired the likes of the renowned Isadora Duncan.

Artwork Photograph by John Faier. © 2015 The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

“L’Affichomania: The Passion for French Posters” was organized by The Richard H. Driehaus Museum and is toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC.

Support for Ticket Registration

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For assistance with ticket registration, please call 334.844.1484 or email our visitor services associates.

 

Creating an account

If you are a new user, select “guest” and enter your information to create your account.

Not sure if you already have an account?

The museum is part of a campus-wide, secure ticketing platform along with the Gogue Performing Arts Center, the Department of Music and the Department of Theatre. You may already have an account if you have purchased or reserved a ticket for a performance at any of the other venues or are an Auburn employee or student. Faculty, staff and students may enter the enterprise account used to access many university systems, such as AUAccess.

Completing your registration

  • Enter the quantity in the dialogue box next to “JCSM Registration” and click continue.
  • Select “Art Kit” from the drop-down box labeled “Section.”
  • Next, you will verify the number of tickets in your shopping cart and click continue.
  • Review your shopping cart and click continue.
  • On the delivery details page, select “email” and continue.
  • Next, you may update your billing contact info.
  • Click “buy” to complete your transaction.

Receiving your confirmation

The system will send a confirmation to the email on file, with a PDF ticket attached and a link to Apple Wallet included. You may print and bring a physical ticket, present the e-ticket on your smart device or download it to your Apple Wallet. Android users should install PassWallet onto your device before clicking to download.

If you are a current museum supporter, you may also have a digital supporter card in your digital wallet. Your digital supporter card is used to redeem Museum Shop discounts and reciprocal perks.

Plan your visit

Museum and university administrators have adopted operational plans in response to COVID-19. For museum-specific guidelines, visit our FAQ page. For the latest from Auburn University, go to the “A Healthier U” website.

Contact us for additional help

For assistance, please call 334.844.1484 or email our visitor services associates.

A detail of a group walking in the woods from a color lithograph.

Collection Spotlight: Faith Ringgold

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To contrast the color lithographs on view in our exhibition of French posters, we’re highlighting lithographs from the museum collection in August for our collection spotlight.

This vibrant work-on-paper is by Faith Ringgold, an artist who works across a diverse media set: painting, sculpting, quilting and performance art. Her work draws upon American history, race and gender issues, often telling stories of enslaved people and the Underground Railroad.

In “To Be or Not to Be Free,” Ringgold illustrates a journey towards a better life.

The text around the print reads:

“Aunt Emmy and Uncle Tate was the first to come to Jones Road in a dream. They followed their dream North to the Palisades and on to Freedom on Jones Road, Barn Door and Precious led 28 of us on that long hard journey thru the woods and swamps with Baby Freedom born on the way, To Be or Not to Be Free. Ringgold 2/11/14.”

Take a closer look.

Why do you think she used such bright colors for the forest and dark colors for the travelers?

Does this narrative still relate to oppressed people today? Why?

Why is freedom personified as a newborn?

A color lithograph of people walking in the woods.

Faith Ringgold
b. 1930
“To Be or Not To Be Free,” 2014
Color lithograph on paper
30 x 22 1/4 in.
Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University; Museum purchase with funds provided by Lynn Barstis Katz
2015.14

Profile of a woman.

#MuseumFromHome: Mucha Coloring Pages

By | Art, K-12 Education, News, Traveling Exhibition, Uncategorized | No Comments

Today, TV and film actors use a wide variety of ways to promote their latest movie or product; but did you know that Alphonsa Mucha was the favorite artist of one of France’s leading ladies, highlighting her plays with vibrant posters? These ads ushered in a new artistic movement called Art Noveau.

Mucha was a world-famous painter, illustrator, jewelry designer and graphic artist. His signature style used twisting lines and subtle colors, flowing hair, halos and mosaic designs.

Thanks to The Mucha Foundation, you can use your own creativity to color in works of art. Then, come explore the real thing in our latest exhibition. Mucha is one of five masters presented in “L’Affichomania; The Passion for French Posters,” on view through Sunday, Jan. 3, 2021.

IMAGE RIGHT: Alphonse Mucha, “Princess Hyacinth,” 1911, color lithograph. Photograph by John Faier. © 2015 The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

HEADER IMAGE: Alphonse Mucha, “Zodiac,” 1896, color lithograph on silk.Photograph by John Faier. © 2015 The Richard H. Driehaus Museum.

L’Affichomania: The Passion for French Posters was organized by The Richard H. Driehaus Museum and is toured by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC.

An actress portrays Princess Hyacinth seated on her throne.
A photograph of a woman lying in the grass.

Aug. 19 is World Photography Day

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Shutterbugs rejoice! World Photography Day celebrates the science, history art and craft of photography. Explore a sampling of works from our impressive collection of prints, which also includes works by Diane Arbus, Gordon Parks, Robert Mapplethorpe and Andy Warhol, among others.

An oriole tends to a nest.

Museum staff conserve Audubon collection

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With more than 100 prints, the Louise Hauss and David Brent Miller Audubon Collection is one of the southeast’s finest and a cornerstone of the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University. Many of the works are hand-colored, and as works on paper, they are fragile and especially susceptible to light, whether from the sun or artificial sources.

To provide the utmost care and to extend the life of the pieces for as long as possible, museum staff implemented gallery improvements while closed. Now, a new motion-activated light sensor system leaves the gallery dark until someone walks in, and modified gallery doors limit further exposure. Preparators also are using an even higher value UV protective glazing in the framing process. These measures reflect the university’s stewardship responsibilities and allow curators to exhibit these and other Audubon prints on a more regular basis. A new exhibition, “Nurture: Audubon’s Nesting Imagery,” is now on view.

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